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The Korean "Four Point" System
By: John Amaro D.C., FIAMA, Dipl.Ac. (NCCAOM)

In my last article "Acupuncture Diagnosis in a Chiropractic/Medical Practice" (Dynamic Chiropractic - October 18, 1999), I discussed the high technology acupuncture examination known as "Ryodoraku" or "Electro Meridian imaging" to determine the status of the meridian system.

Since pulse diagnosis as classically taught, only allows the practitioner to see a maximum of 6 to 8 patients a day, many practitioners of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) have begun to use modern diagnostic procedures along with classical acupuncture stimulation techniques.

Of course one of the most important issues in clinical acupuncture is without question the establishing of a proper diagnosis. This includes determining which of the 12 meridians are involved by either being too high in electro magnetic energy, too low or split between left and right sides of the body.

Once the status of the meridians are determined by Electro Meridian Imaging (Ryodoraku) or by Traditional Chinese pulse diagnosis, it is imperative to balance the meridians to normalcy by toniflying the low meridians and sedating the high ones. In Five Element acupuncture, balancing between involved meridians is classical and focuses on borrowing excessive energy to supply those meridians that are too low.

Acupuncture has numerous approaches around the world to include virtually every Asian nation. However, the Koreans approximately 600 years ago, developed one of the most significant techniques of balancing the meridians which is virtually unknown to most acupuncturists except those in Korea and extreme northern China. The procedure is also very well known in the northern islands of Japan.

The technique requires the use of four specific acupuncture points for each meridian that is shown to be either too high or too low. Whereas in Chinese acupuncture, the utilization of the single "tonification" or "sedation" point is all that is classically used.

Even though simple tonification and sedation will suffice in most cases, for those stubborn conditions that are having great difficulty in establishing a balance, this Korean system is ideal. This technique will balance meridians when other procedures will not.

The four steps for a "deficient" meridian are:
1. Tonify the Horary point of the Mother organ
2. Tonify the Mother organs element point on the affected organ
3. Sedate the Horary point of the controlling meridian (KO cycle)
4. Sedate the controlling organs element point on the affected organ


The four steps for an "excessive" meridian are:
1. Tonify the Horary point of the controlling organ (KO cycle)
2. Tonify the controlling organs element point on the affected organ
3. Sedate the Horary point on the "son" organ
4. Sedate the son organs element point on the affected organ

The fact of the matter is, once a meridian is determined to be too high or too low, rather than going through the procedure of figuring out which points to use, the points are always the same for each meridian either being too high or too low. Follow the provided chart to achieve some of the most spectacular clinical results you will ever experience.

When the following meridians are "DEFICIENT" treat:
LUNG TONIFY SP3 LU9 SEDATE HT8 LU10
LARGE INTESTINE " ST36 LI11 " SI5 LI5
STOMACH " SI5 ST41 " GB41 ST43
SPLEEN " HT8 SP2 " LIV1 SP1
HEART " LIV1 HT9 " KI10 HT3
SMALL INTESTINE " GB41 SI3 " BL66 SI2
BLADDER " LI1 BL67 " ST36 BL54
KIDNEY " LU8 KI7 " SP3 KI3
PERICARDIUM " LIV1 P9 " KI10 P3
TRI-HEATER " GB41 TH3 " BL66 TH2
GALLBLADDER " BL66 GB43 " LI1 GB44
LIVER " KI10 LIV8 " LU8 LIV4

When the following meridians are "EXCESSIVE" treat:
LUNG TONIFY HT8 LU10 SEDATE KI10 LU5
LARGE INTESTINE " SI5 LI5 " BL66 LI2
STOMACH " GB41 ST43 " LI1 ST45
SPLEEN " LIV1 SP1 " LU8 SP5
HEART " KI10 HT3 " SP3 HT7
SMALL INTESTINE " BL66 GB40 " ST36 SI8
BLADDER " ST36 BL54 " GB41 BL65
KIDNEY " SP3 KI3 " LIV1 KI1
PERICARDIUM " KI10 P3 " SP3 P7
TRI-HEATER " BL66 TH2 " ST36 TH10
GALLBLADDER " LI1 GB44 " SI5 GB38
LIVER " LU8 LIV4 " HT8 LIV2


Try balancing the involved meridians you have discovered with EMI evaluation with this ancient Korean approach. It has few equals. I personally use it in the most difficult cases.

John A. Amaro D.C., FIAMA, Dipl.Ac. DrAmaro@IAMA.edu